Tag Archives advertising

The U.K. Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has upheld a complaint against The Cornish Rum Co. against its ads marketing Dead Man's Fingers Hemp Rum. The complainant asserted that two Instagram posts and an ad in a trade magazine used language linking the hemp-infused rum to cannabis, including "Delicious mixed with coke or ginger ale—serve chilled, man. Coming to a joint near you." Another Instagram post featured an image of an outdoor ad reading "Warning: Our Hemp Rum May Cause the Munchies" along with "an image of a skull which was smoking and wearing a hat with a cannabis leaf print." The trade magazine ad included the text "Dealers Wanted." ASA dismissed the portion of the complaint arguing that the ad was intended to appeal to an audience under 18, finding that the images "were not references associated with youth culture and that overall the colours and imagery used gave each…

The National Advertising Division (NAD) has recommended that Clemens Food Group and its flagship brand, Hatfield Quality Meats, "discontinue the claim 'Ethically Raised by Family Farmers Committed to a Higher Standard of Care, Governed by Third Party Animal Welfare Audits.'" NAD acknowledged that the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) reviewed the claim, but the "record here did not demonstrate that FSIS considered consumer impact or that it explained its reasoning with respect to its determination on the 'ethically raised' claim. Accordingly, NAD undertook its own review of the challenged claims." The challenger, Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), argued that the claim misled "a high percentage" of consumers "because they took the claim to mean that the animals’ treatment and living conditions exceed industry standards." NAD noted that AWI provided a consumer perception survey, and the board found the survey to be methodologically sound. Hatfield submitted "caretaker standards, third-party auditing and…

The U.K. Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has upheld a complaint that a television advertisement "perpetuated a harmful stereotype by suggesting that men were incapable of caring for children and would place them at risk as a result of their incompetence." The ad showed a father leaving a baby in a carrier on a conveyor belt as he examined his food options, including Philadelphia cream cheese products. Mondelez argued that it showed two men caring for their children and "took care to ensure the babies were not shown to be coming to any harm." ASA found the arguments persuasive, but it noted that the commercial featured the mother handing the child to the father at the beginning and the father saying "Let's not tell mum" to the child at the end. In this context, ASA found, "we considered the ad relied on the stereotype that men were unable to care for…

The National Advertising Division (NAD) has recommended that Oatly Inc. discontinue marketing representations that its oat milks contain "no added sugars." According to NAD's summary, the challenger argued that "the hydrolysis process, which turns oats into oatmilk, creates sugars 'in situ' as the oats are broken down into smaller components." NAD considered whether the question fell under its jurisdiction, noting that information appearing in the Nutrition Facts Panel would be governed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). "Without taking a position on whether Oatly’s Nutrition Facts Panels are in compliance with FDA regulations, NAD recommended that Oatly not re-post or restate the 'added sugars' line of the Nutrition Facts Panel in its advertising, but noted that nothing in the decision prevents Oatly from using the 'added sugars' line of the Nutrition Facts Panel in a context that is not advertising, such as on product packaging for the purpose…

Shook Partner Lindsey Heinz and Associate Elizabeth Fessler discuss the regulatory and legal implications of food advertising, especially through social media, in the podcast available below. What types of scientific substantiation do companies need to supply for labeling claims, particularly those related to health and safety? Do the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) look to websites and social media when reviewing products for regulatory compliance? What should companies know about retweeting or sharing third-party endorsements? Listen to the podcast (6:53) and read the transcript, available below. LINDSEY HEINZ Have your cake and tweet it too—managing social media marketing campaigns related to food and beverage products can be a tricky legal line to tow. ELIZABETH FESSLER Social media continue to be a powerful marketing tool. And as access to technology expands, social media marketing campaigns are increasingly likely to play a significant role in marketing…

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a report calling for "greater monitoring" of "unhealthy food products, especially those high in salt, sugar and fat." The report asserts that "exposure of children to the online marketing of unhealthy food products" remains "commonplace"—despite the organization's 2010 recommendations on limiting such exposure—and "urgently calls for developing and implementing a set of tools for monitoring the exposure of children to digital marketing." The establishment of a tool to monitor exposure could help "strengthen the case to national governments" for stronger measures limiting children's exposure to digital marketing of "unhealthy products," WHO states.

The U.K. Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has declined to take action against Bacardi-Martini Ltd. following a complaint that its television ad “was irresponsible because it encouraged immoderate drinking by implying that drinking should take place before and throughout a night out.” In its determination, ASA found that “a sealed bottle of Bacardi rum was shown on several occasions but none of the characters in the ad were shown actually serving or drinking the rum” until the group of characters reaches a bar. “The implication was that the group would drink some of the alcohol during their night out, but we noted that none of the characters shown in the ad seemed to be dancing, moving, or otherwise interacting with each other in a way suggestive of intoxication or excessive alcohol consumption at any point, including in the final scenes,” ASA ruled. “For those reasons we concluded that the ad did…

The Council of Better Business Bureaus' Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI) has announced an agreement among 18 companies to strengthen nutrition criteria for advertising to children under 12. Under the agreement, participating companies will not advertise food products to children unless the foods meet several updated standards, including reduced sodium levels. The standards will also limit "whole grain" labeling to those foods that "contribute a meaningful amount of whole grains" and limit nutrient-based qualifiers to "under-consumed" nutrients rather than "essential" nutrients. CFBAI also issued a white paper detailing the updated standards and the reasoning supporting each change. The implementation date is January 1, 2020, chosen to coincide with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's updated food-labeling regulations.

The U.K. Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has upheld the Obesity Health Alliance's complaints against advertisements for Kellogg Coco Pops Granola and a KFC milkshake. The organization asserted that both companies targeted ads for a product high in fat, salt or sugar (HFSS) to an audience under 16. The ad for Kellogg's Coco Pops Granola ran during a children's television show. Kellogg asserted that its granola is not an HFSS product, which ASA confirmed. "However, Coco Pops was a well-established brand, and Coco the Monkey, who was used to advertise all the products in the range, was also well-established as an equity brand character," ASA held. "We considered that many adults and children were likely to very strongly associate the Coco Pops brand and Coco the Monkey primarily with Coco Pops original cereal. At the time the ad was seen by the complainant Coco Pops original cereal was an HFSS product…

The National Advertising Division (NAD) has recommended that Perdue Farms Inc. modify or discontinue broadcast and YouTube advertisements for the company’s Harvestland Organic chicken, finding the ads could mislead consumers into believing all Perdue chicken is organically raised. NAD found that the company's “Free Range” and “All-Veggie Diet” ads featured “general brand references” to Perdue but only “momentary visual references to Harvestland Organic," potentially leading consumers to conflate the two. The ads, which asserted that Perdue's chickens are"happy," also “clearly stated the general claim, ‘Perdue, raising more organic chickens than anyone in America,’” NAD noted. The board further cited a consumer-perception survey submitted by Perdue, finding that “the survey showed that substantially more respondents took away a message about the Perdue brand, generally." "NAD recommended that the advertiser discontinue the broadcast and YouTube commercials or modify them – including the YouTube description copy – to make clear that the advertising pertains…

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